How to recover your motorcycle seat on the cheap!

Th&#1110&#1109 video &#1281&#1077&#1109&#1089r&#1110b&#1077&#1109 th&#1077 unadorned process &#959f straightforwardly &#1072n&#1281 cheaply recovering &#1091&#959&#965r dirt bike seat. Th&#1110&#1109 process &#1110&#1109 really &#959n&#406&#1091 applicable t&#959 motorcycles w&#1110th pla…
Video Rating: 4 / 5

25 Comments

  1. 0
    Posted 08/29/2014 at 7:46 | Permalink

    Awesome! i was very excited and ready to cover the seat of my XS400 (1979)
    but then the wind was knocked out of sails to see my plate is metal!! that
    has tab that are punched out that the cover attaches too, which most have
    rusted off…..

  2. 0
    Posted 08/29/2014 at 8:20 | Permalink

    wouldn’t it be simpler to use a putty knife and level the top of the vinyl
    to the adhesive? I just reckon it would take out all the bubbles. then you
    could pull it really tight when you have to staple it.

  3. 0
    Posted 08/29/2014 at 8:59 | Permalink

    Did my seat today! Was not too terrible for a first try, thanks again! BTW you
    want the PVC backed Vinyl (on the roll) and Joann fabrics, not the pleather
    that is on the shelf.

  4. 0
    Posted 08/29/2014 at 9:09 | Permalink

    Fantastic video. I wanted to do the seat for my ZZR600 myself and everyone
    said it wouldn’t be doable because of the double level… but then you
    just did it! That seat looks exactly like mine, even worn in the same
    place. Thanks for screening the mistakes as well, that is probably the MOST
    helpful part of the video… what to do when it doesn’t go as plotted. Also
    mentioning details such as staple lengths and glue. Fantastic work, keep it
    up. Subscribed. Heading to the fabric store tomorrow!

  5. 0
    Posted 08/29/2014 at 9:26 | Permalink

    Very nice, thank you vm for the vid!

  6. 0
    Posted 08/29/2014 at 9:45 | Permalink

    I have done many dirt bike seats and was taught by a proffesional
    upholsterer. Always staple front and back of seat first, then pull the
    sides tight. That will keep you from having to unstaple the sides. Not
    knocking the video just allotment what I was taught. I used to always do the
    sides first and have the same problem.

  7. 0
    Posted 08/29/2014 at 9:56 | Permalink

    thanks for this vid

  8. 0
    Posted 08/29/2014 at 10:49 | Permalink

    My seat is plastic, but a few test attempts with the staple gun and they
    won’t even penetrate the plastic. At all. I read somewhere that I may
    need an electric staple gun. Am I missing something or do I have to buy an
    electric staple gun?!

  9. 0
    Posted 08/29/2014 at 11:26 | Permalink

    Place some shoes on you’re gonna step on a nail.

  10. 0
    Posted 08/29/2014 at 11:42 | Permalink

    Champion. Thanks for screening your mistakes, too. I reckon that’s pretty
    vital and comforting for anyone who’s stuffed up the same way.

  11. 0
    Posted 08/29/2014 at 12:31 | Permalink

    Where can I buy a new vinyl material? Thanks,

  12. 0
    Posted 08/29/2014 at 13:16 | Permalink

    So the staples go in the plastic?

  13. 0
    Posted 08/29/2014 at 13:30 | Permalink

    Cool I grew up in Baltimore

  14. 0
    Posted 08/29/2014 at 13:58 | Permalink

    Looks pretty sweet, altho recovering it using my method may be a challenge.
    See if the factory sells substitution covers

  15. 0
    Posted 08/29/2014 at 14:35 | Permalink

    @mrmaxstorey oh lol any way you deserve more subscribers

  16. 0
    Posted 08/29/2014 at 15:02 | Permalink

    @mrmaxstorey Hey, thanks right back buddy, never thought of the tumble
    dryer either, excellent call…. tips is for allotment hah?

  17. 0
    Posted 08/29/2014 at 15:46 | Permalink

    Right on dude

  18. 0
    Posted 08/29/2014 at 15:59 | Permalink

    hi Max, I plot to do this for my bike, but my seat did not use any staples.
    Instead, it has these triangular metal tabs that go in the cover and u just
    turn the tabs down. I’m thinking it would be harder to do it since you
    can’t just pull out a staple and tighten the cover. Have you ever come
    across a seat like that? And do you have any suggestions? Thanks :)

  19. 0
    Posted 08/29/2014 at 16:53 | Permalink

    @outdoorsman310 yeah or stickers

  20. 0
    Posted 08/29/2014 at 17:00 | Permalink

    No, that yellow bike is really a RF600. You can see that GSXR at 2:50 on
    my abridged dirt bike history video

  21. 0
    Posted 08/29/2014 at 17:29 | Permalink

    mrmaxstorey, This is really fantastic – in fact, *exact* for me since I own a
    ’94 Seca II! My OEM seat is in exceptional condition and doesn’t need a
    re-cover, but I’m eyeing a Corbin seat that needs a re-cover naughtily.
    It’s pretty cheap, but the cover is certainly shot. It’s more formed than
    the OEM seat but I guess could subdue work… (Looks like:
    corbin.com/yamaha/9295seca2.shtml) Thanks again, let me know your thoughts
    on the Corbin if you have the chance!

  22. 0
    Posted 08/29/2014 at 17:51 | Permalink

    In my videos, I like to show a small skin…

  23. 0
    Posted 08/29/2014 at 18:31 | Permalink

    @Moonfleet41 Wow man thats a fantastic thought I never thought of breaking the
    skin, thanks

  24. 0
    Posted 08/29/2014 at 18:37 | Permalink

    Man, this was a fantastic video! I’m looking at buying my first bike, and the
    one i’m looking at has a tear on the seam and previous to i saw this i wasn’t
    going to buy it because of that, but now i’m going to reconsider and most
    likely get it and do what you did. THANKS for these tips!

  25. 0
    Posted 08/29/2014 at 19:13 | Permalink

    Thanks for the video mate! Will do both my bikes this week, make them look
    surpass and simpler to sell!